American English Videos/Pronunciation Practice/5. Linking

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American English Videos/Pronunciation Practice/5. Linking
Autor American English at State
Área Comunicación y Lenguaje L 3, Inglés
Tipo de licencia Estándar de YouTube
Formato Vídeo
Responsable de curación Editor
Última actualización 2016/05/02
Localización https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iuh6_d_pBaE


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0:06 Hello. I'm Sammy, and this is part three of the connected speech series.
0:10 Connected speech is used when you're speaking quickly and casually,
0:15 and it helps your American English sound more natural.
0:19 Today, we'll discuss linking.
0:22 Linking means combining the sounds from the end of one word to the beginning of the next word.
0:28 American English speakers naturally link sounds together to avoid pauses in fluid speech,
0:35 so practicing linking can help your American English sound more fluent.
0:40 There are two main types of linking: consonant-vowel linking and vowel-vowel linking.
0:49 Consonant-vowel linking occurs when one word ends with a consonant sound and the next word begins with a vowel sound.
0:58 When this happens, we pronounce the words as if the consonant sound has moved from the end of the first word to the beginning of the next word.
1:09 For example, look up is pronounced "lookup," turn on the light becomes "turnon the light."
1:20 That's an umbrella becomes thatsanumbrella.
1:26 Vowel-vowel linking occurs when one word ends in a vowel sound and the next word begins with a vowel.
1:34 You add a "yuh" sound or "wuh" sound in between the vowel sound at the end of the first word and the vowel at the beginning of the second word.
1:46 So how do you know whether to add a "yuh" or a wuh"?
1:49 Let's find out.
1:51 If a word ends in the sounds "ee," "ih," ay," "eye," or "oy" and the next word begins with a vowel, the two words are linked with a "yuh" sound.
2:05 For example, "stay out" is pronounced like "stay yout."
2:10 Linking words with "yuh" happens even if there isn't a "Y" in the spelling.
2:17 "He asked" is pronounced like "he yasked."
2:21 "Sigh of relief" is a "sighyof relief."
2:27 If a word ends in the sounds "uh," "oo," oh," or "ow" and the next word begins with a vowel, then the two words are linked with "wuh."
2:40 For example, "how are you" is pronounced like "howare you."
2:47 Again, linking words with the "wuh" sound happens even if there isn't a "W" letter in the spelling.
2:54 For example, "go inside" is pronounced like "gowinside."
3:03 "Two other people" becomes "twowother people."
3:09 Let's practice! Pay attention to the underlined words in the following story,
3:14 and practice using consonant-vowel linking and vowel-vowel linking.
3:20 Press pause at each screen to go at your own pace.
3:25 (Soft music playing.)
4:22 That's it for now. Next time, we'll practice T&D tapping.
4:26 This is when the T sound gets pronounced like a D, like in the word butter.
4:32 This is American English. Thanks for watching.

For more information, visit: http://www.americanenglish.state.gov/.