Referencias

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  1. Abell, S.K.; Lederman, N.G., eds. 2007. Handbook of research on science education. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers.
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  3. Bransford, J.D.; Brown, A.L.; Cocking, R.R., eds. 1999. How people learn: Brain, mind, experience, and school. Washington, D.C.: National Academies Press.
  4. Bybee, R.W. 1997. Achieving scientific literacy: From purposes to practices. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
  5. Bybee, R.W., ed. 2004. Evolution in perspective: The science teacher’s compendium. Arlington, VA: NSTA Press.
  6. Carin, A.A.; Bass, J.E.; Contant, T.L. 2005. Teaching science as inquiry. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall.
  7. Combs, A.W. 1999. Being and becoming: A field approach to psychology. New York, NY: Springer Publishing Company, Inc.
  8. Cruickhank, D.R.; Jenkins, D.B.; Metcalf, K.K. 2006. The act of teaching (4th Ed.). Boston, MA: McGraw Hill.
  9. Driscoll, M.P. 2005. Psychology of learning for instruction. Boston, MA: Pearson Education, Inc.
  10. Gauch, H.G., Jr. 2003. Scientific method in practice. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.
  11. Hayes, J.R. 1981. The complete problem solver. Philadelphia, PA: The Franklin Institute Press.
  12. National Academy of Sciences. 1998. Teaching about evolution and the nature of science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  13. National Academy of Sciences & Institute of Medicine. 2007. Science, evolution, and creationism. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  14. National Research Council. 1996. National science education standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  15. National Research Council. 1999. Selecting instructional materials: A guide for K-12 science. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  16. National Research Council. 2000. Inquiry and the national science education standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  17. National Research Council. 2001. Classroom assessment and the national science education standards. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
  18. National Research Council. 2005. How students learn: History, mathematics, and science in the classroom. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.
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  20. Project 2061. 1990. Science for all Americans. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
  21. Project 2061. 1993. Benchmarks for science literacy. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
  22. Project 2061. 2000. Designs for science literacy. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
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  24. Project 2061. 2007. Atlas of science literacy (Vol. 2). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
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  29. Scharmann, L.C. 1994. Teaching evolution: The influence of peer teachers’ instructional modeling. Journal of Science Teacher Education, 5, no. 2, pp. 66–76.
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  33. Staver, J.R. 2003. Evolution and intelligent design: Understanding the issues and dealing with the controversy in a standards-based manner. The Science Teacher, 70, no. 8, pp. 32–35.
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